andybrwn

Trapped in an energy field
energy musings, renewables, regulation and policy wonkeshnessdom, polisci rantings, and ramblage. The comments expressed here are my own, and don't represent the position of any business or clients.

 I make no claim of ownership to reposted materials. Barney is a purple dinosaur of love.

libutron:

Horned Sungem - Heliactin bilophus

The Horned Sungem, Heliactin bilophus (Apodiformes - Trochilidae) is a hummingbird native to Bolivia, Brazil and Suriname, characterized by having a spectacular crown tufts showing red, blue and gold, on either side of its iridescent dark blue crown. Upperparts are bronzy-green, throat and upper breast are black while the belly and sides of the neck are white. The tail is long and pointed showing a dark V on white when seen in flight from below. The female is alike but without the spectacular crown pattern or the black throat.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: [Top: ©Joao Bio | Locality: unknown, 2013] - [Bottom: ©Ciro Albano | Locality: Palmeiras, Chapada Diamantina, Bahia, Brazil, 2010]

kqedscience:

Scientists Turn Bad Memories Into Good Inside the Brains of Mice"Neuroscientists have devised a technique for switching the emotional association of a memory from bad to good by directly manipulating the neurons that encode it.If that sounds like a promising therapy for disorders like PTSD, you’ll have to wait. The experiments were done in mice, and the methods, which include genetically altering neurons and inserting an optical fiber into the brain, won’t be used in people anytime soon (if ever). But this study and others like it are illuminating the neural mechanisms of memory in unprecedented detail, and showing that it’s possible to activate, alter, or even create memories just by tweaking the right neurons.”
Learn more from wired.

kqedscience:

Scientists Turn Bad Memories Into Good Inside the Brains of Mice

"Neuroscientists have devised a technique for switching the emotional association of a memory from bad to good by directly manipulating the neurons that encode it.

If that sounds like a promising therapy for disorders like PTSD, you’ll have to wait. The experiments were done in mice, and the methods, which include genetically altering neurons and inserting an optical fiber into the brain, won’t be used in people anytime soon (if ever). But this study and others like it are illuminating the neural mechanisms of memory in unprecedented detail, and showing that it’s possible to activate, alter, or even create memories just by tweaking the right neurons.”

Learn more from wired.

The Child Predator With a Plunder-Provided Pension

laliberty:

Waltham, Massachusetts resident Paul Manganelli is a confessed child pornography collector. Investigators claimed that he was part of “an international web of people trading child pornography over the internet” for a fifteen-month period beginning in late 2011. He was arrested without being the target of a multi-agency military-style raid of the kind recently mounted to bring in a child porn suspect in Livingston, Illinois.

In online conversations Manganelli “discussed his sexual interest in children and asked others how to groom a child to engage in sexual activity with him”; one of his specific targets was an 11-year-old girl with whom he carried out a lengthy cyber-correspondence. It’s quite likely that young girl was not the unique object of his interests, given that Manganelli’s occupation routinely brought him into contact with children who were taught to regard him as trustworthy: For twenty years he was a patrol officer with the Waltham Police Department. He also ran a side business as a DJ for birthday parties and similar events for youngsters.

In 2013, Manganelli was paid $92,435. After being arrested in March of that year, he remained on the force until October. Because he finished twenty years on the force, Manganelli is entitled to his full pension.

Ordinarily, a Massachusetts resident convicted of possessing child pornography would face sentence of up to 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. The prosecution treated this offender with unwonted leniency, asking for 70 months; Judge F. Dennis Saylor regarded that sentence as too harsh, imposing a five-year term and waiving the fine outright. Manganelli has ample resources to pay the fine: In 2011, he won $1 million in the state lottery, and at present there is no statute that would prevent him from receiving his annual $100,000 payout.

I couldn’t decide what to bold without bolding everything.

0ddly-romantic:

So I got a graphics tablet for my birthday and it arrived about an hour ago, fiddled around with it for a few minutes and this is what I came up with :) not too bad for my first go. Just a scanned drawing and added some colour, gonna try a sketch soon.

0ddly-romantic:

So I got a graphics tablet for my birthday and it arrived about an hour ago, fiddled around with it for a few minutes and this is what I came up with :) not too bad for my first go. Just a scanned drawing and added some colour, gonna try a sketch soon.

(via cosima-geekmonkey-niehaus)

thebicker:

wheeliewifee:

apparently yesterday’s meeting was eventful in all the wrong ways… I’m honestly really glad I missed it.
Check out this quote from Senator Kennedy— A DOCTOR:
“Sometimes access to health care can be damaging and dangerous. And it’s a perspective for the [Legislative] body to consider is that, I’ve heard from National Institutes of Health and otherwise that we’re killing up to a million, a million and a half people every year in our hospitals. And it’s access to hospitals that’s killing those people.”
Yeah…….

Mike Kennedy — a physician by trade and a Republican rep in the Utah state legislature — did indeed try to argue that, because people die in hospitals, the hospitals must be dangerous. It’s definitely not because people happen to go to the hospital because they are not feeling well. If people can’t afford to see a doctor, they can’t get sick and die. That’s just science, people.

thebicker:

wheeliewifee:

apparently yesterday’s meeting was eventful in all the wrong ways… I’m honestly really glad I missed it.

Check out this quote from Senator Kennedy— A DOCTOR:

Sometimes access to health care can be damaging and dangerous. And it’s a perspective for the [Legislative] body to consider is that, I’ve heard from National Institutes of Health and otherwise that we’re killing up to a million, a million and a half people every year in our hospitals. And it’s access to hospitals that’s killing those people.”

Yeah…….

Mike Kennedy — a physician by trade and a Republican rep in the Utah state legislature — did indeed try to argue that, because people die in hospitals, the hospitals must be dangerous. It’s definitely not because people happen to go to the hospital because they are not feeling well. If people can’t afford to see a doctor, they can’t get sick and die. That’s just science, people.

(via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)